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redguard
Commie Bastid

Registered: Aug 2000
Location: Cnafilornia
Posts: 406
Question regarding terrorism

I'm just about to lay my head down for the evening, but there's this one little question that's bobbling around in the back of my brain:

What in the hell are Cuba and North Korea doing on George Bush's "terrorist" list?

I checked out several articles on MSNBC and CNN regarding this puzzle, and came up with this:

1) Cuba has granted asylum to at least three members of FARC.
2) North Korea hasn't "done enough" to combat the spread of terrorism.

Am I the only one who sees some sort of peculiarity in this sort of logic?

There are, after all, plenty of nations that aren't really doing anything at all about terrorism. I don't fucking see Zimbabwe on that list.

Oh yeah, and then there are the nations that have actively sold military hardware and munitions to the other five Islamic nations on the list (nations like Iran, Iraq, Syria, and Libya). These purveyors of the instruments of destruction are not on the list. Maybe that's because the U.S. is chief among them ( in all fairness, let's not forget Russia and China...they do it too).

On the topic of harboring terrorists, what about the United States? After WWII, we not only pardoned the vile sons of bitches who used (invented) modern biological weapons on the Chinese (killing somewhere between 10,000 and 200,000), but we set them up here in the States with big houses, cushy jobs, and pensions. Those that survive reside here still, far from the hands of the Chinese who would dearly love to bring them to justice. Based upon the logic in George's argument against Cuba, we should be right up there too, a couple spots above them.

I don't know about you, but the above situation seems considerably worse than "harboring three members of FARC" whose terroristic indictments remain unvoiced.

click here for more info:
http://fas.org/nuke/guide/japan/bw/


What the hell about Pakistan, the nation that's pretty much widely acknowledged as Al Qaeda's secondary (now primary) base of operations? The Al Qaeda training manual even mentions tactics on how to deal with questions involving transit in between Pakistan and other nations, since most intelligence personnell are aware of its status as a haven and breeding ground for terrorists. Why isn't Pakistan on that list?

Click here for training manual excerpts:
http://www.fas.org/irp/world/para/manualpart1.html

I'm not just blowing rhetoric in order to make a point. I've been out of the loop for a while and would sincerely appreciate some enlightened input on the subject.

Thanks in advance

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Old Post 05-22-2002 10:23 AM
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RiZZ
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its like thoes monkeys with the giant asses

thoes cunts

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Old Post 05-22-2002 10:28 AM
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philjit
Arch-Enemy of Idealism

Registered: Jan 2002
Location: UK
Posts: 13056

I expect this thread will get moved to Politico, but I will answer what I can now, at least try anyway. I must admit when I watched the news yestedray I was very confused with the inclusion of Cuba. Particularly after the Carter visit and the very quick back peddling Powell had done on the bio-weapons issues. Saying basically, 'we didn't say he had bio-weapons, we said he has the ability to do the research on bio-weapons for offensive purposes'. WTF? Doesn't almost every nation in the world have that? Anyways, that statement by Powell was just said because Carter suddenly came out and said his intelligence briefing before his visit said, quite catergorically, 'we have no evidence that Cuba are making bio-weapons for terrorists'. So the Cuba one did confuse me somewhat, I just put it down to politics really Redguard.

Think about it, Carter has just comeback and started talking up the trade embargo issue. This has prolly ruffled a few feathers I think in the WHitehouse, you can imagine the private conversations, things like 'Who the fuck does Jimmy Carter think he is!' that kind of shit (can't wait to hear the tapes in ten years btw ). So, the Whitehouse has put Cuba in there as a political spin against the Democrats and Carter. A pretty reasonable move in the scheme of the game. They have had a shitty week remeber too, what with the intelligence story, so if you add this to the Carter business, they need to take the news agenda by the horns again. This kind of works for them I guess.

I was also surprised at Iran's inclusion somehwhat, although their concession about 'doing something but not enough' was a welcome sight. Mind you the position I have on Iran is more the British one and not the American one. I think North Korea's addition is strange I must say. I am not saying they are not a dodgy bunch of fuckers, but I would like to see what terrorism they are sponsoring. Can someone tell me? After all, they are Communists so I doubt very much that they would be helping religious extremists, or vice versa. Are they involved in insurgency in Taiwan I wonder and therby helping the Chinese?

I think the list is not really a list of terrorist threat around the world. Its more a list of groups we don't like around the world.

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Old Post 05-22-2002 11:00 AM
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euphorbia
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Registered: Apr 2001
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[QUOTE]Originally posted by Phil


Think about it, Carter has just comeback and started talking up the trade embargo issue.


Id like to see better relations with Cuba, I have no problems with Cuba other than the problems its own people has with it. I will say Carter doesn’t know everything the sitting president knows, and Cuba would be a very strategic friend to any enemy of ours, something the Russians took advantage of. Carter is an admirable man sometimes, his work with Habitat for Humanity is admirable, but for him to act like he knows everything thats is going on and make comments like this about wholly important matters is idiotic and despicable imo. Anyone wonder why Castro let him in? Played our national anthem for him when he landed? Seem a bit fishy to you?




I was also surprised at Iran's inclusion somehwhat, although their concession about 'doing something but not enough' was a welcome sight.

No way, their government is crap. I understand the Iranian people are the most pro western in the middle east because of it.
Doesn’t surprise me one bit, same types of zealots helping run the government there as were in Afghanistan. In 2001 the Department of State listed seven countries as state sponsors of terrorism - Iran, Iraq, Sudan, Libya, Syria, Cuba, and North Korea. Of these, Iran represents the greatest terrorist threat to the United States. Iran ris controlled by conservative clerics opposed to reform and good relations with the west. The Government of Iran supports antiwestern acts of terrorism by others with their own money.


I think North Korea's addition is strange I must say.

I dont. has been included on the U.S. Department of State's list of states that sponsor terrorism since 1988, after North Korean agents blew up a South Korean airliner, killing 115 civilians.

here are some reads...


"North Korea and Terrorism
Perhaps more significant than North Korea's stated commitments against terrorism are its activities that contribute both to instability in the region and to the proliferation of terrorist organizations.

According to one estimate, North Korea--whose economy is so dysfunctional that it relies on international aid to feed its people--spends over 14 percent of its gross domestic product on its immense military force. 10 Since the early 1990s, when its economy collapsed, the DPRK has pursued trade with such states as Angola, Burma, Cuba, Iran, Iraq, Libya, Pakistan, and Syria as its only means of earning hard currency. Most of the trade involves arms, chemical and biological weapons materials, and even ballistic missile technology--in clear violation of the Missile Technology Control Regime. Libya, for example, recently bought 50 Rodong-1 missiles from North Korea with a range of 1,000 kilometers.

Significantly, the North has sold weapons to such terrorist groups as the Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam and the United Wa State Army, a drug-trafficking group active in the Burmese sector of the golden triangle (Laos, Burma, and Thailand). In addition to supplying terrorist organizations, North Koreans have been seen training in the terrorist camps in Afghanistan.

The threat of terrorism from North Korea was made clear by the Deputy Director of the Central Intelligence Agency, John E. McLaughlin, who warned earlier this year that

North Korea's challenge to regional and global security is magnified by two factors...first, the North's pursuit of weapons of mass destruction and long-range missiles, and two, its readiness--and eagerness--to become missile salesman to the world.

North Korea had been accused of state-sponsored terrorism long before Afghanistan decided to give shelter to Osama bin Laden. It has been on the U.S. Department of State's list of states supporting international terrorism since 1988, following the 1987 bombing of a South Korean airliner by North Korean agents that killed over a hundred people. The U.S. State Department's annual Pattern of Global Terrorism report for 2000 states that North Korea has links with terror organizations, has sold arms to these groups directly and indirectly, and continues to harbor several Red Army hijackers of a Japanese Airlines flight en route to North Korea in the 1970s. The State Department's 1999 report stated that North Korea had links with Osama bin Laden.

North Korea is not known to have sponsored any terrorist acts directly since 1987, and the DPRK declares at every opportunity that it shuns every form of terrorism and any act that assists it. 16 Yet its actions over the years belie such statements.

The DPRK has consistently engaged in maneuvers to undermine the South since signing the 1953 Armistice Agreement to end the war on the Peninsula. It has committed over 300 instances of provocation against the South and in the 1990s alone infiltrated the South in at least 15 separate incidents. In one of the most blatant, 26 North Korean commandos in a submarine landed off the South Korean coast in September 1996; they, along with 17 South Koreans, were killed in the ensuing manhunt. Their mission is believed to have been to assassinate South Korean dignitaries.

Since 1953, North Korea has kidnapped over 3,600 Korean citizens. While most have been returned, 442 are still being held. It also has abducted foreigners, most notably 10 Japanese citizens, which remains a key obstacle to normalizing relations with Japan. 18 Other acts of state-sponsored terrorism include the following:

In November 1969, a domestic Korean civilian airliner was hijacked and 51 passengers were taken to the North, where 12 still remain in captivity.
In January 1968, a North Korean commando team sought to blow up the presidential residence in Seoul, assassinate government officials, and blow up the U.S. embassy. Fortunately, the attempt was foiled and the members of the team were captured.
On October 9, 1983, one of the most devastating North Korean acts against South Korea occurred in Burma, when an assassination attempt was made on President Chun Doo-Hwan. The bombing killed 17 senior Korean officials, including cabinet ministers, and wounded 14 others.
Thus, despite repeated DPRK declarations condemning terrorism, including a 1991 joint pledge with the South to "refrain from all acts destroying and overthrowing the other side" and not use arms against one another, and a May 1994 statement "opposing any act encouraging and supporting terrorism," its actions betray its lack of sincerity. Notably, the 1996 submarine incursion, as well as a subsequent submarine incident in 1998, occurred despite the cooperation underway under the Agreed Framework established in 1994 with the United States.

"


Now of course you can question the sources and I’m sure find some sources telling about how great these countries are or that we just don’t like them because they (2 of them) are communist nations rather than on the merits, but I think that’s rather silly and would disagree.


http://www.state.gov/s/ct/rls/pgtrpt/2000/
http://www.heritage.org/library/bac...pdf/bg_1503.pdf

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Old Post 05-22-2002 01:39 PM
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philjit
Arch-Enemy of Idealism

Registered: Jan 2002
Location: UK
Posts: 13056

you misundersatnd me phorbie. When I say North Korea surprised I refered directly to its rather limited actions in terrorism which are arguably domestic in nature. In fairness what you put up, while wholly despiciable as actions ie hijacking a plane, is something that is a legacy of the Korean War (which we lost) and is arguably at least no different to the China/Taiwan issue. Its a domestic war dispute between South and North Korea. The same as Kashmir, yet Pakistan is not in the list? That was my point. If you are gonna include North Korea, then you should also include Pakistan. But we don't.

quote:
Iran ris controlled by conservative clerics opposed to reform and good relations with the west. The Government of Iran supports antiwestern acts of terrorism by others with their own money.


MI6 and the Foreign and Commonwealth Office say different.

Last edited by philjit on 05-22-2002 at 01:59 PM

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Old Post 05-22-2002 01:54 PM
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philjit
Arch-Enemy of Idealism

Registered: Jan 2002
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Like I say, the list is not a list of terrorist states, its a list of state we don't like atm. If it was a list of terrorist states, then Pakistan would be included.

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Old Post 05-22-2002 01:56 PM
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euphorbia
caustic milk - hybrid

Registered: Apr 2001
Location: behind the irony curtain
Posts: 19147

quote:
Originally posted by Phil
you misundersatnd me phorbie. When I say North Korea surprised I refered directly to its rather limited actions in terrorism which are arguably domestic in nature. In fairness what you put up, while wholly despiciable as actions ie hijacking a plane, is something that is a legacy of the Korean War (which we lost) and is arguably at least no different to the China/Taiwan issue. Its a domestic war dispute between South and North Korea. The same as Kashmir, yet Pakistan is not in the list? That was my point. If you are gonna include North Korea, then you should also include Pakistan. But we don't.



MI6 and the Foreign and Commonwealth Office say different. [/B]


There is a bit about that on the first link I posted babe if you want to see what they have to say about it.

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Old Post 05-22-2002 02:00 PM
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philjit
Arch-Enemy of Idealism

Registered: Jan 2002
Location: UK
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I realise that Pakistan is mentioned, but its sponosrhip of terrorism has been far greater and far far more open than anything that North Korea has ever done.

On the Iran point, the Foriegn Office of my nation and our Ambassadors and intelligence services say very different about the Iranians and their activities. Hence the fact that if you watch that Tony Blair interview I posted you will see he refuses to be drawn on saying the same things about Iran as the US Administration. We think differently about them. And I agree with our position, which is gorunded in just as much factual assessment as your nations position.

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Old Post 05-22-2002 02:13 PM
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Thimbles worth of opinion
Symetrically challenged

Registered: Aug 2000
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------------------------------------------philibuster
things like 'Who the fuck does Jimmy Carter think he is!' that kind of shit (can't wait to hear the tapes in ten years btw ).
-----------------------------------------
Something like this perhaps?
http://www.frontpagemag.com/columni...zov05-20-02.htm
Isn't political supposedly dervived somehow from polite?
Geez how things change.

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Old Post 05-22-2002 08:43 PM
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Deadpool
Latin Lover

Registered: May 2001
Location:
Posts: 2701
Re: Question regarding terrorism

quote:
Originally posted by redguard
I'm just about to lay my head down for the evening, but there's this one little question that's bobbling around in the back of my brain:

What in the hell are Cuba and North Korea doing on George Bush's "terrorist" list?

I checked out several articles on MSNBC and CNN regarding this puzzle, and came up with this:

1) Cuba has granted asylum to at least three members of FARC.
2) North Korea hasn't "done enough" to combat the spread of terrorism.

Am I the only one who sees some sort of peculiarity in this sort of logic?

There are, after all, plenty of nations that aren't really doing anything at all about terrorism. I don't fucking see Zimbabwe on that list.

Oh yeah, and then there are the nations that have actively sold military hardware and munitions to the other five Islamic nations on the list (nations like Iran, Iraq, Syria, and Libya). These purveyors of the instruments of destruction are not on the list. Maybe that's because the U.S. is chief among them ( in all fairness, let's not forget Russia and China...they do it too).

On the topic of harboring terrorists, what about the United States? After WWII, we not only pardoned the vile sons of bitches who used (invented) modern biological weapons on the Chinese (killing somewhere between 10,000 and 200,000), but we set them up here in the States with big houses, cushy jobs, and pensions. Those that survive reside here still, far from the hands of the Chinese who would dearly love to bring them to justice. Based upon the logic in George's argument against Cuba, we should be right up there too, a couple spots above them.

I don't know about you, but the above situation seems considerably worse than "harboring three members of FARC" whose terroristic indictments remain unvoiced.

click here for more info:
http://fas.org/nuke/guide/japan/bw/


What the hell about Pakistan, the nation that's pretty much widely acknowledged as Al Qaeda's secondary (now primary) base of operations? The Al Qaeda training manual even mentions tactics on how to deal with questions involving transit in between Pakistan and other nations, since most intelligence personnell are aware of its status as a haven and breeding ground for terrorists. Why isn't Pakistan on that list?

Click here for training manual excerpts:
http://www.fas.org/irp/world/para/manualpart1.html

I'm not just blowing rhetoric in order to make a point. I've been out of the loop for a while and would sincerely appreciate some enlightened input on the subject.

Thanks in advance



Wanna get away with human right violations and state sponsored terror? Join the UN. Zimbabwe, Burundi, Sudan and a bunch of other countries did. Hell....some of them even made it to the Human right commision council. Yay new world order.

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Old Post 05-22-2002 10:34 PM
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Paint CHiPs
Smartest Man in the World

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Let it percolate, moved to Politico. Check out that forum, redguard. You might like it, dirty communist pinko scumfuck that you are.

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Old Post 05-23-2002 04:54 AM
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Thimbles worth of opinion
Symetrically challenged

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Location:
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Glad to see you're open to new ideas paint.
Here's one for ya' capitialist monkey raping libertarian flag humping dildo muncher.
GET A JOB!

All the best to you on your move..
Thimble.

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Old Post 05-23-2002 05:00 AM
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Gavin
burdened student

Registered: Jul 2001
Location: Nanaimo, BC
Posts: 424

Well, let's take a look at some of these countries, shall we?

In Cuba, America installed brutal dictators (under both plain military juntas and "democracy") from the turn of the century up until the nationalist revolution in 1959, under Castro. We controlled virtually every aspect of their economy and government, building an infrastructure that supported American sugar plantations and refineries. At the time of the revolution, we thought that Castro was one of our boys, but when he decided to nationalize all industries (at considerable compensation to American businesses), the US launched a massive terror campaign against them during the Kennedy administration. This was before Cuba even turned to the Soviet aid. So, our government became so enraged that our violence culminated in the Bay of Pigs invasion and the Cuban Missle Crisis, almost precipitating nuclear war. Cuba literally had no other choice but to embrace the Russians - it was either that, or suffer another crushing US-controlled regime.


In Korea, the United States practically tore their their country apart during the Second World War. Basically, the Japanese had occupied the penninsula for 35 years and a strong anti-imperial resistance had emerged, like the anti-fascists in Europe - but they had already set up local governments in many parts of the country. When Japan capitulated and the U.S. invaded South Korea, we wiped out their resistance and restored a lot of Japanese collaborators to government. Before the North even attacked the South in 1950, we killed something like 100,000-150,000 Koreans, and split their country in two.


So why do we hate these countries? Is it because they're terrorists, or is it because they're independent? Granted, they're authoritarian dictatorships, and North Korea is a brutal tyranny, but we carried out huge terror operations against them for years, but apparently, those don't count. And by our actions, I think it would be safe to say that retributive justice is the way we do things, so if we had any kind of honour at all, we would 'take the hit' and shut the fuck up. Either that, or seriously re-examine our moral compass.

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Old Post 05-23-2002 02:28 PM
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CHiPsJr
Ginger-headed Troll

Registered: Sep 2000
Location: Kansas City
Posts: 7511

[QUOTE]Originally posted by Gavin
[B]Well, let's take a look at some of these countries, shall we?




Good God, where do I even BEGIN?

1. The US "installed" brutal dictators? On what basis do you make this statement? I'm no apologist for Batista or many of his predecessors, but the bulk of the historical evidence seems to suggest that the series of coups and counter-coups in Cuba was the result of internal bickering. What reason would we have to kick out the same guy we just put into office six months ago?

2. The "nationalist" revolution in Cuba was perpetrated by Castro and his followers, a couple of thousand in a nation of millions. It was, in short, another coup in a long line thereof.

3. WHAT compensation to American businesses??? I'd love a link on this. Are you referring to the assets forcibly seized from Cuban holdings in the US?

It is worth noting that the exploitative businesses which were raping Cuba were also providing its workers with the highest per capita GNP in Latin America as of 1959. Whereas now a considerable number of those liberated workers seem curiously compelled to set themselves afloat in the Carribean in pursuit of any other life than the one they're living.

4. "Massive terror campaign?" Other than our various clumsy and comical attempts to assassinate Castro, what did this "massive terror campaign" entail? Surely the economic sanctions can't be what you're referring to here.

5. How can the "massive terror campaign during the Kennedy administration" have "culminated" in the Bay of Pigs, which occurred something like six weeks into his term and was planned by Eisenhower?

6. The "US campaign of violence" precipitated the Cuban Missile Crisis? Funny; I though that had something to do with the secret placement of missiles in Cuba by the USSR. Most historians seem to agree that this was an attempt by Kruschev to create a bargaining chip to get US missiles out of Turkey. By what earthly chain of logic is the placement of missiles in a satellite state the fault of the rival superpower?

7. The Cubans had no alternative but to embrace Communism and the USSR as a patron? OK. The Russians have been gone for thirteen years. What's their excuse now? And where is the US invasion that USSR patronship was "necessary" to avoid? Funny; the door's been wide open for thirteen years and we've been oddly slow about setting up a puppet state.

The continued existence of the Cuban and North Korean regimes is pretty clearly the product of US restraint. I'd be reluctant to call them "terrorist" states, as their use of violence against their own citizens far exceed that against outsiders, but there's not a thing about those two governments which merits anything but scorn.

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Old Post 05-23-2002 06:10 PM
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Thimbles worth of opinion
Symetrically challenged

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Filling in some blanks.
''The resurrection of Dr. Strangelove bodes ill for Cuba''
By Doreen Miller
http://yellowtimes.org/article.php?...=thread&order=0

(YellowTimes.org) – Witnessing the unfolding of present-day events is like watching something out of a grade-B, Hollywood, science-fiction horror flick, a lá Dr. Strangelove. However, the truly frightening part is that it's not a movie. The main character is a xeno- and ideophobic, hyperparanoid, power-hungry, self-delusional, trigger-happy leader run amok. He and his administrative warriors have convinced themselves that they have the right to launch nuclear missiles from their huge arsenal of weapons of mass destruction not only in response to a chemical or biological attack, but also (more shockingly) in first, "pre-emptive" strikes against nations who are allegedly plotting terrorist attacks against their country. After all, according to their logic, nuclear bombs are really no different from conventional weapons. Besides, with its high-tech wizardry, know-how, and precision, their military would easily be able to minimize the consequences of nuclear fallout.

Welcome to the wonderful world of George W. Bush, et al.

Caught up in this maniacal zeal to take on and rule the whole world, U.S. President Bush's number three man, Undersecretary of State John Bolton, made public on May 6, in his "Beyond the Axis of Evil" speech to the Heritage Foundation, Washington's intentions to extend military action to three additional countries including, of all places, the small island-nation of Cuba. Therein, he boldly charges Cuba with developing bacteriological weapons and of selling to rogue nations "dual-use" biotechnologies which could theoretically be used against the USA in future terrorist acts.

In fact, his wild accusations are merely that, unsubstantiated suspicions. His speech amounts to a heap of propaganda whose sole purpose is to stir up anti-Cuban sentiments by manipulating and exploiting the post-September 11 fear factor in U.S. citizens in order to justify any future military incursions against that tiny country.

If the truth be known, under the guidance of Fidel Castro, Cuba has invested a great deal of resources and energy (10% of state spending) into medical research with the result that it boasts a sophisticated and well-developed health care system that covers ALL of its citizens (which is more than can be said for the United States). It has especially made progress in biotechnologies associated with treating heart attacks, viral diseases and the development of vaccines against meningitis, hepatitis B and other serious, life-threatening illnesses, according to a May 08 article in the BBC. Cuba has actively shared these technologies with a number of countries, especially Third World countries - some of which have more recently been arbitrarily designated as "rogue" nations by the Bush administration.

Time and again, disgruntled Cuban defectors have raised the same false accusation of Cuba's supposed biological warfare research and development programs. However, investigators from the Miami Herald, top officials at the U.S. State department, and Dr. Raymond Zilinskas, a senior scientist at the Center for Non-proliferation Studies at the Monterey Institute of International Studies each time have separately come to the same conclusion: "There's been no evidence they're doing anything; there's never been evidence; the stuff simply doesn't check out."

The Center for International Policy quotes a U.S. official interviewed in 1999 by Juan Tamayo of the Miami Herald : "Stuff that sophisticated always has dual use [medical and military], no way around it… But none of what we know adds up to Cuba having offensive biological warfare capabilities." After a current inspection of Cuba's medical research facilities, even former President Jimmy Carter vouches for Cuba's innocence of Bolton's far-fetched allegations.

So, what could possibly be the ulterior motive behind Bolton issuing a threat against Cuba? I suggest that the statement directly prefacing Bolton's allegation strongly hints at a more probable, underlying reason for threatening U.S. military aggression: "Cuba leads in the production of pharmaceuticals and various vaccines that are sold worldwide." Hmm, it sounds as if Cuba is unacceptably cutting into the sacred profits of U.S. pharmaceutical companies!

Another point that bears worthy consideration is that Castro has been a thorn in the side of the United States ever since his successful ouster in 1959 of the highly corrupt regime of "Washington's-most-favored-son," Batista.

Shortly after his rise to power, Castro earned the enmity of the United States by nationalizing U.S.-owned enterprises, one prime example being the Bacardi Rum distilleries. Unhappy with its loss of hegemonic influence, the United States initiated a series of terrorist actions against this struggling nation - unabated acts still being carried out today - that would claim the lives of thousands of Cubans over the next 42 years.

The infamous Bay of Pigs blunder in 1961 was backed, financed, planned, and carried out by CIA personnel with the blessings of Presidents Eisenhower and Kennedy. This failed coup was followed by the largest assassination campaign in modern history against Fidel Castro, who is reputedly said to have survived over 630 attempts on his life.

Throughout the sixties, Cuba repeatedly suffered hundreds of acts of sabotage, terrorism and psychological warfare including sea and air commando raids by exiles; damage to oil refineries, chemical plants, railroad bridges, cane fields, sugar mills and warehouses; and pirate attacks on Cuban fishing boats and merchant ships.

In October 2001, Executive Intelligence Review exposed a horrifying account of the recently declassified CIA "Operation Northwoods" documents which were drawn up in 1962 in conjunction with officers within the highest level of the Pentagon whose arm of the project they named "Operation Mongoose." The top brass proposed and were ready to execute the idea of using U.S. military personnel to carry out pseudo-Cuban terrorist acts against the United States and U.S. military facilities in order to deceptively win over unconditional, U.S. public support and to create a pretext for a full-scale invasion of Cuba to overthrow Castro.

In an eerily familiar-sounding "wag the dog" scenario, some of the proposals included carrying out terror campaigns in Miami, other Florida cities and even Washington; blowing up ships, exploding plastic bombs, harassing and hijacking civil air and surface craft, the "simulated or real" sinking of boatloads of Cuban refugees, and the simulated shooting down of a chartered civil airliner in Cuban airspace.

All this was to be accompanied by the arrests of "Cuban agents" and the release of carefully prepared "documents" proving their guilt. If it weren't for the somewhat greater moral compass of President Kennedy, who refused to entertain such a diabolical plan, this nightmare perpetrated against unsuspecting U.S. citizens might have actually become a reality.

Throughout the past 40 years, the U.S. government has not only balked at taking steps to deter Miami-based Cuban exiles and terrorist organizations from carrying out acts of aggression against Cuba, but in fact, knowingly continues to harbor them. In 1976, Orlando Bosch, a CIA operative and Cuban exile, was arrested in Venezuela for blowing up a Cuban airline in which 73 people were killed. A comment from The Guardian on February 08, 2002, unveils the very real hypocrisy between U.S. foreign and domestic policy, "Amazingly, Bosch was granted a pardon by George Bush senior in 1990 and is now in Florida, apparently untroubled by the current president's commitment to rooting out terrorism in all its forms…he remains...protected by the same government that warns other countries that they are either for or against terrorism."

In 1984 while being tried on a homicide charge, Eduardo Arocena, leader of the Omega 7 terrorist group, admitted to having participated in a 1980 operation to introduce viruses as part of the war on Cuba. This offers a logical explanation for the four vastly destructive epidemics that emerged between 1979 and 1981 and seriously beleaguered the island: hemorrhagic conjunctivitis and dengue fever which afflicted over 340,000 people, resulting in the deaths of 158 people, 101 of them children, and sugarcane rust and tobacco blue mold which all but wiped out the island's two major export crops.

Only 5 years ago, Raul Ernesto Cruz León was arrested in Havana for a series of bombings in various hotels and in the famous Bodeguita del Medio restaurant that killed one Italian youth. As the New York Times stated in 1997, he confessed to being paid $3,000 for each bomb he planted by the Cuban American National Foundation (CANF) - another Cuban-exile terrorist organization based in the United States.

Just a year ago in April 2001, three members of Miami's Alpha 66, an anti-Castro terrorist organization, were caught trying to land on Cuban soil. At the time of their arrest, they had in their possession a rather curious assortment of harmless tourist paraphernalia: four AK-47 assault rifles, one M-3 rifle with a silencer, three Makarov pistols, night goggles and communications equipment. They claim they were sent on a mission to indiscriminately kill Cuban civilians and sow terror on the island.

Castro's appeals for U.S. cooperation in rooting out the terrorist acts directed against Cuba from U.S. soil have constantly fallen on deaf ears. For years, Cuba has handed over detailed, well-documented information to various U.S. government agencies, up to the highest levels, complete with names and conclusive evidence of criminal acts of terrorism, yet U.S. officials have chosen to cast a blind eye - neither a single arrest has been made nor any investigation ever been initiated.

Instead, in June 2001, a Miami court convicted on trumped-up espionage charges five Cuban undercover agents who were monitoring Miami-based, right-wing terrorist groups in an effort to protect their homeland against future attacks. They were sentenced from 15 years to life in prison as a result of a controversial, highly-biased, political trial based on pure speculation, out-of-context excerpts of manipulated documents, and phony "expert" testimony. In a travesty of justice, the prosecutors in this mock trial used every means possible to successfully suppress over 90 percent of the defendants' documentation of innocence and the true purpose of their mission.

The United States' unrelenting assault on Cuba includes a series of punitive trade embargoes in food and medicine that have been in effect since 1960. When Cuba refused to roll over and die after the collapse in 1989 of its main trading partner, the USSR, the U.S. government enacted additional, more intensive trade embargoes in 1992 through the Torricelli Act and again in 1996 through the Helms-Burton Act. The latter not only attempts to extend U.S. sanctions against Cuba to a global level by threatening legal action, fines, and economic sanctions against American or U.S.-friendly industries that continued to do business with Cuba, but also allocates no less than $5 million to finance and support the activities of counterrevolutionary groups.

These latest rounds of U.S. sanctions have been universally condemned, with the UN having issued numerous resolutions calling for an end to the embargo against Cuba, first during 1992-95, and again in 1999. The words of world-renowned Dr. Benjamin Spock highlight the more insidious intentions of U.S. policy towards Cuba: "I believe very few Americans realize what our country is trying to do down there - starve people into submission and deprive children and old people of medicine." What could be more representative of a genuine act of terrorism and an international war crime than withholding and blockading life-essential food and medicine for a civilian population?

In his defense, René González Sehweret, one of the five Cubans recently convicted of "espionage," describes Cuba as "a nation of people whose only crime is having chosen their own path, and having defended that choice successfully, at the cost of enormous sacrifices..."

He goes on to issue a warning against ignorance and complacency within the American public towards U.S. foreign policy and unchecked military might: "...the hatred and ignorance we have seen here towards a small country, which nobody here knows, can be dangerous when combined with a blinding sense of power and false superiority."

For the United States government and its citizens, however, the most politically and morally significant question was posed by Ramón Labañino Salazar, a second of the five convicted Cubans, who defended his actions carried out within the U.S., a country not only unempathetic and unresponsive to, but, in essence, complicit in the continued assault on and suffering of the Cuban people: "How many more deaths of innocent human beings must we witness before this insane and absurd policy towards Cuba is ended?"

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